LGR – Commodore PET Computer System Review

March 13, 2015 by 42 Comments



An overview of the history, hardware, and software of the CBM 8032 from the perspective of a vintage computer collector. How do the pros and cons stack up, what games can you play on it, and is it worth the cost?

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Music used in order of appearance:
“Bounce House” by Silent Partner
“Left U Into” by Otis McDonald
“Get Back Up” by Silent Partner
https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music

source

42 Replies to “LGR – Commodore PET Computer System Review”

  1. the PET looks and feels like a computer straight out of the modern Fallout games

  2. emenefer says:

    whoah wtf why does clint look kinda quirky doe in this old video

  3. Jeremy Young says:

    I had a crappy Compaq Presario made for windows 95

  4. But can it run doom

  5. The Commodore PET Computer shape like Darth Vader.

  6. G slam says:

    We had these pet computers in grade school back in 1978/80 /pretty useless hahaha .

  7. @4:18: You got that right! Even Capt. Kirk, a collector of antiques, will have one in his personal antique collection in his home in about 265 years from now:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/xmo5s9s6cw6hgm5/Antique%20Commodore%20PET%20Microcomputer%20at%20Adm.%20Kirk%27s%20Home%2C%20c.%202285.jpg?dl=0

    Space Age, man, it's got that Space Age excellence, see hehehehehehehe

  8. I managed to fairly recently find one of these for $100 on fb marketplace with the floppy drives too

  9. Orkan says:

    hi clint, why is there a vga on the proccesor?

  10. Josh Neilson says:

    Seriously, that power supply though 😱

  11. Do you think Clint has ever pleasured himself to an old computer? Nothing sexual on it, at most a DOS prompt? Complimented with sniffing some new-old stock components while banging furiously on a super clicky keyboard?

  12. All Gaming says:

    Jack: "let's call it the 2001"
    Peddle: "but it's 1978"
    Jack: "people won't notice"
    Jack: 0_0

  13. Actually had this machine AND my father in law had the calculator ☺☺Novel for its time and friends and family had PCs such as the Amstrad 1640 which a friend of mine used in his business with AHHHHH ☺'Supercalc' ☺☺Heck that was an amazing program for his accounts / printouts that reflected his sales with pie charts et I bought that system and used it until my wife started using Excel et Oh and that was used with a dot matrix printer which was superb for continuous printout not like todays single sheet printers et

  14. What a great keyboard! 6:30

  15. Michael Elsy says:

    It still looks great. Some of the games looked quite good for the time.

  16. I have a commodore PET 4032 in my computer collection. it was the first computer that I had in my collection as a guy sold one to me for 10 gbp at a carboot sale.

  17. Ahmad Nasser says:

    Will anyone talk about how the building at the left in the game Ouranos says "YOUTUBE" on it?

  18. I was born over a decade before this brand of computer came out, but this is the first time I have seen one working. (Somewhat later, I had an Apple ][+, and in between and concurrently with that, I had mainframe computer access — you sure could find some weird things in big computer rooms back then as well . . . .)

  19. UubrMan X says:

    Was Millipede ported by Sierra?

  20. Reminds me of some of the terminals in Fallout 3

  21. I always thought it be cool make modern day computer that looks like some of the old popular computer from 70s 80s.

  22. ringaddict says:

    I had one in 1983 and taught myself Basic on it, eventually wrote a full version of space invaders on it, still have the dot matrix print out of the program somewhere, text very faded now though..

  23. Zone B says:

    Damn! It would be nice to have a friend cool as you! Awesome PET btw

  24. I remember that programming book as I had it when I was a teenager. My first computer was a Dick Smith Wizzard, which was a rebadged CreatiVision computer from VTech and I spent ages trying to modify the programs to work on it as the basic was mostly incompatible. I managed to get some simple programs working with limited success but alas, most wouldn't work.

  25. jin choung says:

    lololol i had no idea it had the thing to prop up "the hood" like a freakin' car!

  26. I started with the c64 with Commodore computers, but it's good to see these older computers

  27. Clint we here in the U.K. had them and they were called the PET,there’s even one in the Science Museum in London and that’s called the Commodore PET. I remember a lad in my village growing up even had one. So i don’t know where this Europe had CBM thing came from. I clicked the video because of its name,I’ve never known it as anything else

  28. Yohann Last says:

    I had to come watch this again. I used to work at T-I.

  29. Yohann Last says:

    Wayne S. Green II, W2NSD (“Never Say Die”), of Hancock, New Hampshire, a Ham Radio Friend of mine, Really Pushed Computers and look at how many Magazines He Created, these onlt Computers, there were many others.

    Wayne Green was founder of 73 magazine; Byte magazine; Kilobyte, which
    became Kilobaud, then Kilobaud Microcomputing; 80 Micro magazine for the
    TRS-80; Hot Coco for the TRS-80 Color Computer; Run for the Commodore
    64, inCider magazine for the Apple II; and several other computer
    magazines.

    Indeed, Green often was ahead of the curve in promoting
    such technologies as single-sideband phone, solid-state, FM, and the
    marriage of computers and ham radio, and he went on to found and publish
    Byte and other computer-oriented publications. “I live mostly in the future,” Green was quoted as saying.
    Former ARRL Contributing Editor Stan Horzepa, WA1LOU, once wrote in
    his “Surfin’” web column, “We take computers and the Internet for
    granted today. I first became interested in computers when Wayne Green,
    W2NSD, started writing about them in 73 magazine in the 1970s. Back then, you had to build your own from scratch or from kits.”

  30. OverRide says:

    CBM – Continental Ballistic Missile. Well done Commodore!

  31. j2simpso says:

    Looks like you got a young PET there, Clint! Barely see any fur on it! Hard to pet the PET, I suppose 😛

  32. 1:58 "…with the production version finalized as the PET 2001." I kinda miss the good ole days when computer manufactures were making Space Odyssey jokes.

  33. CountDabula says:

    Is Fallout in the tags for this video? It should be, I'm surprised more people didn't come here to see the actual terminal they based the fallout ones on

  34. The fallout terminal

  35. First computer I ever used was a Commodore PET. I was about 8 and the library had a number of them in a side room. We were taught the basics of basic. I never cared for it. It had no soul. Although it did have a very sharp monitor.
    Soon after that I touched an Apple II+ for the first time and it was love at first sight.

  36. jimvideotv says:

    There was a thump when the CBM was turned on. Was the power switch louder then the speaker?

  37. $900 + $350 shipping to the UK, for the model reviewed in the video. You paid $79… I could have bought 11 of them with that $900 and made $9000 profit. What’s the interest rate at the bank again…. 😂

  38. Rain says:

    wow fuck Texas Instruments

  39. Nemo88881 says:

    my first crush was a PET 3032

  40. Purely by chance I paused this at 2:05 (wife was calling me about some non-8bit computing related nonsense)
    It didn't half remind me of Deep Thought when I looked back at the screen! 🙂