Primitive Technology: Polynesian Arrowroot Flour



Primitive Technology: Polynesian Arrowroot Flour – Creating Polynesian arrowroot flour from scratch.
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About This Video:
I gathered polynesian arrowroot, grated it, extracted and dried the starch and cooked it into gelatinous, pancake shaped food that tasted like rice noodles. Polynesian arrow root is a plant in the same family as yams but with a different growth habit. It has a single, branching leaf and a single tuber below ground. They were brought to Australia about 5000 years ago as one of the “canoe” plants carried by Polynesian seafarers and grow wild in the hills near my hut to this day. The tubers are rich in starch but have a bitter compound that needs to be leached out with water to be made edible. This same compound is traditionally a medicine in small quantities for treating a range of illnesses from gastrointestinal upset to snake bite. I dug up the tubers which took about 3 minutes to do per plant, yielding one golf ball sized tuber each. These were then washed and grated into a pot using a roof tile. The resulting mash was mixed with water and allowed to settle. The white milky water was then scooped into a second pot and the starch was allowed to settle. The water was then poured off and more starch water was tipped in. At this stage the starch was still bitter, so it was mixed with water, allowed to settle and the clear water above was poured off several times removing this bitterness. When it tasted good, the paste was put onto a tile to dry over a fire. Some of it cooked and became small rubbery pieces of starch. The dry flour was stored in a pot. Some of this was then mixed into a paste and cooked on a tile like a pancake. It turned clear when cooked and has a rubbery texture. It tasted just like a rice noodle which is unsurprising considering the ingredients are nearly the same. Starch is the largest carbohydrate in the human diet. Polynesian arrowroot starch contains 346 calories per 100 g (wheat contains 329) and so the discovery of this staple food is fairly significant. It can be stored indefinitely if kept dry and away from weevils or can be stored as live tubers for six months (then they begin to sprout and should be planted). The live tubers bitterness means animals will not eat them which is good for storage. I may cultivate some in a small plot in the hills near where I dug them up. They are numerous in the wild but may produce more if the soil is tilled.

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Primitive technology is a hobby where you build things in the wild completely from scratch using no modern tools or materials. These are the strict rules: If you want a fire, use a fire stick – An axe, pick up a stone and shape it – A hut, build one from trees, mud, rocks etc. The challenge is seeing how far you can go without utilizing modern technology. I do not live in the wild, but enjoy building shelter, tools, and more, only utilizing natural materials. To find specific videos, visit my playlist tab for building videos focused on pyrotechnology, shelter, weapons, food & agriculture, tools & machines, and weaving & fiber.

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25 Replies to “Primitive Technology: Polynesian Arrowroot Flour”

  1. RULERofSTARS says:

    I saw Ray Mears do pretty much the same thing but with roasted, ground acorns. He left them in a mosquito net in a stream to wash out the tannin.

  2. Че тут думать: есть глина- что-нибудь слепишь😆

  3. Looks like coke the bad coke

  4. у австралийцев мелкие потаты под морковью.

  5. I feel sick 🤢🤮🤮🤮

  6. Masalllahhh Masalllahhh Masalllahhh 👍✋🙏✋

  7. فزعتكم العراقين اشتركو بقناتي

  8. Alex Sii says:

    Ребята! Один человек не способен обслуживать все это, давно смотрю ваши виде и вижу, что пора прийти к логическому раскрытию всей концепции, ведь ты один не можешь двигать технологии, добывать пищу, искать руду, делать эти прекрасные корзины и прочее. ЖДУ когда уже кто то из "тех кто делает" подобные видео, соберет общину!!! Это ведь естественный ход, давайте ребята кидаю вам идею) Основывай племя))) кто то на корзинах, кто то на хлебе, кузницы куют железо! ЙААххООууу Age of Emperis ! С Любовью from Russia!

    Keep your mind clear.

  9. Enes ay 3170 says:

    Ya yürü gitya videoları kim yüklüyo yutuba doğada hayatta kalmaymış bide

  10. 800 هههههههههههههههههه

  11. hdhd li says:

    人与自然和谐相处

  12. Djas M says:

    Tuber is like tumor but vegan.

  13. Oberon Play says:

    Exactly the same videos you watch at 3 a.m

  14. Beanle says:

    you know… there's a reason why people rather watch this than like "building a 2 story house with pool in the woods primitive"

  15. GameDoggs MC says:

    The most impressive part of his creations is that even though he uses the resources for his own survival, he still respects nature and replants the plants to grow once again.

  16. Temet says:

    Polynesian Pancakes: Check 🙂

  17. Lucas Hein says:

    Hey, u just created tapioca!!

  18. Nature take care of him

  19. Дружище молодец!!! А тебя что – жена из дома выгнала ? :))).

  20. João Vitor says:

    Tapioca ñ é panqueca

  21. Я кузнец . И у меня есть ютуб канал на тему ковки , оружия , самоделок diy , очень прошу тех кому по душе такие ролики, оформить подписку на мой канал https://youtu.be/8xSvcQFO6MY .

  22. Wow! you make me hungry. Can I have some? I will try this.