Diamond Viper VLB: $550 Windows 3.1 Accelerator Card

March 27, 2020 by 23 Comments



Windows 3.1 running at 1280×1024 back in 1993? 24-bit True Color mode, too? Entirely possible with the 2MB Viper VLB video card! Let’s see what it can do with the LGR Woodgrain PC, including Windows and DOS games, various software, and benchmarks.

● LGR links:
https://twitter.com/LazyGameReviews
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https://patreon.com/LazyGameReviews

● Music courtesy of Epidemic Sound:
http://www.epidemicsound.com

#LGR #Retro #Graphics

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23 Replies to “Diamond Viper VLB: $550 Windows 3.1 Accelerator Card”

  1. Robbie says:

    Thought that was a heatsink until 1:32

  2. I am pretty sure that even though it supports Windows 3.1, this card was designed for Windows NT 3.1 what you could actually use as an Workstation.

  3. Eden Rose says:

    Wish someone could make a custom board with both…

  4. It's so weird nowadays not needing to put silicon paste on the processor on the Old processors

  5. 8:20. That's basically what people buy thousand dollar iPad Pros to do today…when they're not using them as typewriters!

  6. It's amazing how much more simplified computer tech is nowadays.

  7. Clint has a troll'ish voice when he speaks.

  8. my first comp 286…

  9. Must admit it's a bit weird to see comparing video cards in dos, that isn't meant to speed up stuff like games and such, they are all based on cpu calculations, that including putting pixels in low and high res

  10. Sir Tanon says:

    My VLB choice back then was the Orchid Fahrenheit VA/VLB. Quite a bit less expensive, but still very good, especially for DOS games. This one was just way too much.

  11. Dang dude, this makes me happy. I honestly wish I knew more about this sort of stuff, it really interests me but its hard for me to wrap my head around. I dont even know where to start or what to look up to begin with. I'd like to mess with older computers someday. Great video

  12. senilyDeluxe says:

    mmh that OTI chip has its own 256k of VRAM and looks like it can be upgraded to 512k. I have a few DOS games that would use that…
    I remember my Commodore PC40-III has dipswitches where you could configure the (s)VGA card to boot up in 132*43. That was a blast! And showed which programs didn't expect that.

  13. Pierre Lucas says:

    I would say between 70 to 90 dollars.

  14. Pierre Lucas says:

    Today beetwen 5 to 15 euros. The graphic chipset integrated in an motherboard today on an 250 euros pc is very quicker.

  15. Naa .. all crap .. get your own the speed of an VGA card with a Tseng ET4000 /w32 .. and you can feel the power 🙂

  16. Steven McFly says:

    Diamond. Man, good stuff. My friend had a Stealth. Geezus that thing was sick!

  17. Natomon01 says:

    Where did you get the drivers? I've been searching for them.

  18. This is more interesting than RTX 3090. My first PC had CGA adapter, so this is cutting edge.

  19. mrdali67 says:

    These were like you noticed not at all ment for DOS mode at all. I had one of these cards when they came out. The primary reason to get one of these cards were for running Windows in 1600×1200 with a 85Hz capable CRT monitor, and it should be said its not a gaming card either. Its a Windows accellerator. Meaning the Vietek P9000 was able to to speed up standard windows 2d draw functions. And there is a hell of a difference if you came from a lesser graphics card like eg a standard Tseng ET4000, wich would all only run 60Hz max and iirc could barely show 1280×1024 mode with 1mb of video ram. The onboard RAMDAC is also a high Quality one to be able to scan at 85Hz wich means it gives a much more crisp, stable and eye friendly view when working many hours in front of the PC. Should be mentioned that the all HQ Ramdac is wasted if you ran a Wodoo card wich like most people that tried these had kinda poor quality video output, but in gaming mode you don't really notice it. They were kinda expensive, but I think I payed the hillarious price of double this ammont for my first 17" CRT wich was a BIG screen back then. I also remember for my first PC that came with a standard 80Mb disk. After getting loads of games and software delivered on tape backups I had to buy a larger disk, and I remember paying like 7-800$ for a 200Mb disk …. just think of how many original games and software you could buy for that ammount .. lol

  20. golan4x says:

    Did you benchmark by any chance the performance in Photoshop 3 between the 486 and the overdrive?

  21. Yale Zhang says:

    Why the separate Oak VGA chip? Is it that hard to design your own high performance VGA chip?

  22. The kinda video where you're like "Is it worth watching?" then when it's finished you're so glad you watched it. 👌